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These Schools offer Vocational Trade School


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Berkeley Collegelearn-more-button1


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Baker Universitylearn-more-button1


Baker UniversityLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut aliquam diam semper velit vehicula viverra. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam ultricies, velit eget sodales laoreet, libero mauris facilisis est, finibus luctus quam diam in tortor. Suspendisse egestas quis lectus ac scelerilearn-more-button1

Argosy Universitylearn-more-button1


Argosy University2Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut aliquam diam semper velit vehicula viverra. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam ultricies, velit eget sodales laoreet, libero mauris facilisis est, finibus luctus quam diam in tortor. Suspendisse egestas quis lectus ac scelerilearn-more-button1

Abilene Christian Universitylearn-more-button1


Abilene Christian UniversityLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut aliquam diam semper velit vehicula viverra. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam ultricies, velit eget sodales laoreet, libero mauris facilisis est, finibus luctus quam diam in tortor. Suspendisse egestas quis lectus ac scelerilearn-more-button1

Cardinal Stritch University learn-more-button1


Cardinal Stritch UniversityLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut aliquam diam semper velit vehicula viverra. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam ultricies, velit eget sodales laoreet, libero mauris facilisis est, finibus luctus quam diam in tortor. Suspendisse egestas quis lectus ac scelerilearn-more-button1

Ashland Universitylearn-more-button1


Ashland UniversityLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut aliquam diam semper velit vehicula viverra. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Nullam ultricies, velit eget sodales laoreet, libero mauris facilisis est, finibus luctus quam diam in tortor. Suspendisse egestas quis lectus ac scelerilearn-more-button1

Exploring the Advantages and Opportunities in Career-focused Education

Being successful in the job market these days means needing to have the skills and training of an educated professional. An increasing number of jobs demand that applicants have at least a post-secondary degree or a certificate equal from some program of higher learning. This topic has been so controversial that in 2009, the president of the United States, in his State of the Union Address, challenged students and working Americans to complete at least a year of a post-secondary level of education. It has been projected, by the Center of Education and by the Workforce at Georgetown University, that by year 2018, almost two-thirds of the jobs in the U.S. will require workers to have a post-secondary education to even be considered for hire.

Top 2016-2017 Vocational Schools

There are numerous different trade schools and vocational schools from which to choose for those whom are seeking some professional training. Some programs popular among this kind of schooling are nursing programs, culinary arts, and engine mechanics. These career-geared programs are offered in community colleges, trade schools, and other vocational training institutions. Following is a list of the 2016-2017 highest accredited trade and vocational schools, with rankings based upon areas dealing with teacher and student ratio, tuition, financial aid availability, and other significant factors.

Search Vocational & Trade Schools Near You

Because different trade schools and vocational schools have different training and educational options, prepared below is a search tool designed to help you find which school will best accommodate you and your educational desires.

Exploring Vocational Programs

The main purpose of vocational schools is to offer those looking to specialize in a certain career the training needed to excel in that chosen work of choice. While a broader-based educational school will study core subjects and different career options for the future, vocational schools focus more on teaching individuals about one fixed chosen trade.

What are Vocational and Trade Schools?

Career schools can also be referred to as trade schools, vocational schools, and technical schools, as defined by the U.S. Department of Education, and can be for non-profit or profit, and can be either for the public or to the private. The programs offered are typically ones that take two or fewer years to complete, and focus on specialized career training.There can be slight differences in curriculum between vocational schools and technical schools. Vocational schools usually involve hands-on training to strengthen skills needed in particular fields, while technical schools tend to incorporate a more expanded approach to the learning, dealing also with the principles of the study.

Students whom wish to go further than vocational and technical schools for their training may consider CTE, or career and technical education. Students can find such programs offered at these following institutions:

  • Community colleges (two-year, public colleges)
  • Private two-year colleges
  • Public and private four-year universities
  • Regional training centers
  • Adult workforce education centers
  • Industry groups

Students can earn their diploma, a credential, or a certificate through a CTE program. They can receive both, occupational and non-occupational instruction from numerous subjects among widely varied areas of interest. There are some CTE programs that allow students to transition into associate’s degree programs and schooling similar, however, most CTE programs are used as a terminal point and do not offer an option to transfer credits for continued learning.

Educational institutions that focus on the academic aspect of learning, for example, liberal arts, English, mathematics, physical sciences, performing arts, social sciences, humanities, behavioral sciences,et cetera, are not considered CTE learnings. CTE programs are designed to teach students about specialized career fields, categorized into 16 divisions.

  • Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
  • Architecture & Construction
  • A/V Technology & Film
  • Business Management & Administration
  • Education & Training
  • Finance
  • Government & Public Administration
  • Health Sciences
  • Hospitality & Tourism
  • Human Services
  • Information Technology
  • Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Planning
  • Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Is Vocational School Right for You? High School Assessment

The high school populace today has a myriad of different options as far as continued learning after high school. They can enter a two-year college, a four-year university, or they can enroll in trade or vocational schooling. This option can allow for a person to begin their career of choice within as little as a year by providing them with the training that is relevant to that career through programs created to highlight a particular line of work.

Vocational & Trade School In-Depth

Prior to enrolling in one of these trade schools or vocational schools, it is important to understand what is expected, from you and for you. Knowing the typical salary of the job in which you are interested in pursuing is a good idea, as one should like an idea of their average earnings from a job before applying. Knowing which institutions offer which programs is a must as well. You wouldn’t want to enroll in a program that does not suit your needs and interests. Take a look at what some of these trades programs have to offer its students.

Projected Job Openings

When considering joining a vocational training program, students have a great variety of pathways that they can choose to go. The number of companies requiring a vocational education for employment is rapidly increasing.Per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the ten industries projected to have the highest rate of employment between 2012 and 2022 will all deal with vocational studies.

Pros & Cons

Vocational education has become quite respected within the past 30 years as a way for one to prepare for their career, as it represents a student’s and worker’s extensive training and skill in their field of work. This sort of schooling will only become more popular. It is a way to show that our working world is committed to excelling in the work environment. Employers will be able to hire staff with confidence in the fact that the skill set is firm amongst them. While there are these positives, students should know that there can be some hindrance in completing an occupational degree, diploma, credential, or certificate.

PROS

Increased Market Competitiveness.Being as a more direct means to establishing a career, employers oftentimes seek those who have a vocational education, making the competition for a job a stiffer one.

Improved Career Opportunities.The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) along with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, (BLS) have both conducted surveys and collected data that proves that in the long run, having an education pays off! It was found that in year 2013, those with an associate’s degree earned more per week than those with only a high school level education by 19.3 percent. It was also concluded that those with an associate’s degree had a lower level of unemployment rate than individuals who have a high school diploma. The unemployment rate of those with a high school diploma was approximately 7.5 percent, compared to the approximate 5.4percent in degree holders.

Shorter Programs.Depending upon the program, a vocational education can be completed within three months to two years. A typical bachelor’s degree program takes four years to complete.

CONS

Stigma.Although vocational programs are the more convenient and helpful approach to entering the workforce for some people, others may sometimes still view it as having a negative connotation, as these programs do not require as much time to complete as other degree or certificate accomplishments.

Limited Career Flexibility.Seeing as how these types of programs are aimed to gear a person into a fixed direction, this can lead to little flexibility when it comes to job selection in that, 1) the credits do not carry for furthering an academic pathway, and 2) for employment in advanced related fields, the credits may not be accepted toward a set requirement.

Lower Average SalariesWhile an education from a vocational-based program can potentially help a person earn more financially than without the training, those holding the associate’s degree still earn 31.2 percent less than those with a bachelor’s degree.In 2013, persons holding an associate’s degree, on average, earned about $35,720 annually.

Before Enrolling

 

  • Success rate.How well a student thrives from the education they receive oftentimes reflects the quality of school in which they have attended. Potential students should be aware of three major learning institution statistics: admission rate, graduation rate, and job placement rate. A high admissions rate may be an indicator that the school is not in high competition with other educational establishments. A low graduation rate can be taken as a clue that the school is not sufficiently instructing their pupils. And a low job placement rate may indicate that the school is not properly preparing its students and alumni for the workforce.
  • Program cost.Many students’ first concern with seeking higher education is the price. It should be noted that tuition is not the only fee associated with continued learning.Students should know about technology and lab fees and should inquire about additional funding needed for software and equipment, books, and so on. Having this knowledge prior to enrolling will help the student better succeed in finding the right program for them.
  • Accreditation.Accreditation is a sometimes overlooked, but significant key in the review phase. It represents how well a school performs as far as delivering a quality education and decent success rate for its students. Many agencies, such as ones in the certification and licensing areas, require that employees graduate from a school with official accreditation, especially when going into fields of medicine and medical research. The Department of Education does not accredit schools directly, however, the department does have an approved list of agencies qualified to do so for post-secondary programs. Take a moment to review the Department of Education’s Database of Accredited Postsecondary Institutions and Programs for more information.
  • Admission requirements.Different educational establishments have different requirements for admission. Prior to enrollment, students should be aware of the differences in requirements between one school and another by inquiring about admissions processes.Some programs may require that you have a high school diploma or certificate equal. Also, is professional experience a must for being accepted into the program?And does the student need to have standardized test scores available at the ready?
  • Instructor Background.The quality of a school’s faculty impacts the success of a school’s program. When considering enrollment, students should do their research on the instructional staff in which they are to receive their education. Does the instructor have lots of experience in the subject they are teaching? Do they have credentials? Does the instructor possess any certificates of excellence?

FAQs: Interview with Sean Lynch, Legislative and Public Affairs Manager

Sean Lynch is the Legislative and Public Affairs Manager for the Association for Career and Technical Education located in Alexandria, Virginia. He contributedhis views on the topic of CTE, and on movements in vocational education and why it is a sound and useful form of post-secondary training.

What is the role of ACTE and why is it important for prospective students to know about/connect with ACTE?

ACTE is the largest national nonprofit association dedicated to CTE professionals, including educators, administrators, career and guidance counselors and others connected to the CTE community. Our role is to advance education that will prepare students of all ages for success in their careers, including through advocating for effective federal policy, building public awareness and sharing best practices and resources with professionals in the field.

Could you describe the current trends in vocational education?

One thing that we are seeing increasingly is engagement among the employer community with CTE programs, because they recognize that these are a critical part of their efforts to bridge the skills gap. According to the Manpower Group Talent Shortage Survey published in 2014, 25 percent of employers stated that the reason they could not fill existing job openings is a lack of applicants with necessary workplace competencies–things like teamwork, critical thinking, and creative problem solving. As employers are realizing that CTE programs can teach technical skills (which were also cited as a challenge among applicants) relevant to 21st century careers and these employability skills that are in high-demand, I think we’re seeing a trend toward stronger partnerships forming across these two communities.

Vocational education seems to have a somewhat negative connotation, e.g. that it is only for working-class kids and adults. Is that necessarily the case?

I’m glad this question got raised, because it is an important one. When many people hear about career and technical education (or Vocational Education), they often envision a dirty facility in the back of the school. CTE programs have made enormous strides to ensure relevancy and earn their place as a component of every student’s education, regardless of their background. CTE engages students and gets them excited about learning, helps them apply their academics in a hands-on way and lets them explore their potential career interests so they can have a meaningful discussion with their parents and counselors about what postsecondary plans make the most sense for their chosen career field–whether that’s a two- or four-year degree, other credential or entering the workforce.

What are the general benefits of a CTE education?

CTE provides a really unique way for students to apply their academic curriculum in a context of their career goal–so a student who might struggle to conceptualize the slope of a line may find it easier when that’s the pitch of a roof. It engages students with relevant, real-world learning opportunities, which 81 percent of dropouts report would have kept them in high school. And it helps students to have productive dialogues with their families and career and guidance counselors about where they are going in their career path and what steps they need to take to get there–about 6 out of 10 students in CTE programs report that they intend to continue on in that career field, and the others are still gaining technical and employability training and readying themselves for their future.

Do you have any advice for prospective students considering a CTE/vocational education?

I can’t emphasize enough the importance of working with career and guidance counselors to make a plan for your education that includes CTE, no matter what your postsecondary plans are–there has been a great emphasis on spreading the message that CTE is for all students, and we’re seeing a stronger understanding of how it can fit into every educational experience.

In light of the White House’s push for greater access to post-secondary education, how do you/ACTE feel CTE and vocational education fit into the mix of options?

I think the White House’s efforts are really getting at the need to overcome the skills gap, particularly in a lot of high-growth, critical industries that are instrumental in ensuring our continued economic growth and competitiveness. We’ve all heard the statistics about this–that middle skill careers are growing and a significant part of the economy. And it’s critical that we prepare students today for the 55 million jobs that will be created by 2020–including the 30 percent of those that are going to require some college education or a two-year degree.

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